Enjoying the Perfect Moments in Life

I had lunch with my wife, my son and my daughter in-law yesterday. We ate at a restaurant right by the water. The sky was blue, the temperature was about 78 degrees, the lake was gorgeous and we were together. And to top it all off, the food was wonderful. It was just one of those perfect moments, when all is right with the world.

It wasn’t of course. All was not really right with the world. There were thousands of issues, thousands of problems, hundreds of thousands, millions, billions of people in various states of struggle and stress. But for us, in that moment or that hour, it felt that way.

I am so grateful that Jesus went to banquets. I’m so glad he went to that wedding and turned the water into wine. I think it shows us that even in the midst of dealing with the mess of living in this broken world, even in the midst of seeking to be Jesus’ hands and feet, in the pain and hurt that is all around us, it’s OK to have moments that are rich and perfect – moments that are about living in blessing and joy!

Jesus cared deeply for the poor. Jesus lifted the status of those who had no place in the culture in which he lived. Jesus gave his life so that we might know what it means to live. Jesus was the perfect picture of service. But once in a while he went to parties, he came to banquets, and he enjoyed those perfect days that come along every so often.

Peace,
Bill

Having Pure Motives

I just finished watching again the last episode of one of my all-time favorite TV shows. I have seen it a number of times but every time it grabs me. Every time it brings a tear to my eye. The show is about people with pure motives. It is about high ideals. It is about loving truth and standing on principle and accomplishing good. The show stirs me even though I know the episodes well.

I think story that taps into our emotions like that, story that affects us and touches us to the core of our passion for that which is right and decent, respectable and uplifting, connects us to God, it connects us to Gospel. Whether we realize it or not, whether we acknowledge it or not story, good story, real true story, connects us to God and Gospel.

Art is the same, as it captures us in its magnificence. The beauty of creation is the same as it takes our breath away causing us to simply stand without speech, and marvel at what is before us. It joins us to the wonder of God.

I am not suggesting that these things, story, art, creation, and a host of others we could mention, are God, they are not. But they are all connected to God, they are expressions of God, they are − I dare say − opportunities to experience and encounter God. And all these things remind me that God is so much bigger than the little boxes in which we try to put God.

God is good. God is every good. God is all good. And when we see good, when we experience good, when we live good, it all connects us to God. Yes, God is bigger than the greatest good we have ever seen or experienced, but good is always, in whatever form, an expression of God and a means of grace.

When I finished watching my show this evening, my heart was full. So much turning out right. Even the painful was muted by the characters’ care of one another. And as I watched I was again reminded that I so much want the world to be like that.

You can call me naive and you can call me foolish, you can call me whatever you would like, but I do believe that the vast majority of my mission as a follower of Jesus is to bring good wherever I can. To bring good to my family with the words I use and the way I act. The way I listen and the way I behave. To bring good to my work with simple acts of respect for all people and a movement day by day away from self- centeredness towards humility (I have a significant way to go on all these!). To bring good by standing up for the needs of the few not just the many, to side with those who hold the short end of the stick in virtually every measure of success.

Friends, I want to live out the goodness of God. Like story and art and creation, I want my life to be a reflection of the good God wants the world to see and experience. I want to be, in a world of pain and hurt and violence and injustice…GOOD! I want to live out grace. I have a long way to go, but I believe it’s what I am called to be and where I’m called to go. Anybody want to go with me?

Peace,
Bill

What About Me?

What about me?!  What about my side?!  What about my team, my people, my perspective, WHAT ABOUT ME!!?

This sentiment gets expressed in so many ways doesn’t it?

It certainly got expressed to my parents as I was growing up when I thought my sisters were getting something I wasn’t.  How unfair, unjust it was when they got the larger piece of cake or the extra half hour up before bed time.  But of course, like most children, I got that turnabout reality parents often receive when I had to hear those same complaints from my kids when Robin and I made similar decisions affecting them!

I hear similar sentiments now as a Superintendent sometimes when our VCI teams identify the need for churches to focus on outreach and the people who aren’t in the church yet.  The response is so often, “what about me!  What about my desires and preferences?”

My mind was drawn to this issue this past week as I heard the news reports of the Muslim worshipers targeted by the driver of a car in London.  I went there in my head because as I heard the story of the attack, I was reminded of some voices I have heard over the last year both on social media and in other arenas claiming that when the Muslim community is the target, the media and others get all upset and report the tragedy in significant ways, but you “don’t hear anything about Christians who are persecuted.”   “What about me”, “What about us” has been a response I have heard from some circles.

Of course the reality is that any persecution is incredibly tragic and painful and so far from what any genuine person of any faith would seek.  But as a follower of Christ it seems to me that my last response to another’s pain ought to be “what about me, what about my pain?”  As followers of Jesus we are constantly called to put others above ourselves, to see the need of the one we might lift up.  So when our response is self-focused, when we constantly clamor for our rights, pointing out how poorly we have been treated in whatever setting or circumstance, it often causes us to miss the opportunity to care for the needs of the other.

Many of Jesus teachings identify clearly our calling to be the ones who don’t look for places where we might have been missed, overlooked, or supposedly discounted.  Jesus instead invites us to let go of score keeping and become the servants of all.  Oh I know, it’s not easy for us.  It takes a real focus and lots of prayer to get there.  And I for one have a long way to go.  But spending our lives in “what about me” mode is the opposite of the way our faith invites us to live.  In fact I think Jesus said something about those who cling to their lives, their “rights,” their privilege, and those who instead give their lives away, giving themselves up on behalf of others.  I believe his suggestion is that genuine happiness and purpose come from the latter, and deep loss from the former.

You can check for yourself, but I’m pretty sure that’s what he said.

Peace,
Bill

Goodbyes & Hellos

There are around 120 pastoral moves happening across the state this month.  Those of you packing the last of the boxes and getting ready for the truck to arrive are well aware that this process is not always an easy one.  There are tearful goodbyes around leaving those with whom relationships have been build.  There are accomplishments and ministries to be celebrated but also left to be continued (or not sometimes) by the congregation and the next pastoral leader.  Times of transition are times of grief to be sure for pastors and congregations.

But I hope they are also times of excitement and energy around the new beginning.  I still remember the first sermon I preached in my first appointment out of seminary.  The text was John 1 “In the beginning….”  In retrospect, there was perhaps a bit of presumption in seeing MY arrival as pastor as The Beginning!  I was very careful of course to talk about all that had gone before and the good ministry and leaders the church had experience for decades before my arrival!

But there is a sense that pastoral change brings something new.  There is an inherent hope in our system of itinerancy that the new pastoral leader will bring new gifts to the congregation.  There is an inherent hope in our system that the next pastor will come with renewed energy to continue the good work a church is doing with the strong lay leadership that is in place or that they will help move a struggling congregation towards a new future that is rich and good and fulfills the mission Christ has given.

Now I believe that every day is a new day with God.  I believe that to my core.  Every day is an opportunity to start fresh, to begin anew, both as individuals and as congregations.  So, the fact is it’s not only churches that are experiencing pastoral change that have the opportunity to celebrate (or ask forgiveness for) the past and engage the future with prayer, vision, and new life.  But pastoral change does provide, both for clergy and laity alike a clear “comma” moment, an obvious opportunity to take stock, to look for where God is leading now, in this day, and hopefully enable movement towards an envisioned future together.

Please know I am and will be praying for all reappointed pastors as you go into new settings.  Please know I am and will be praying for congregations as you receive new pastoral leaders.  And please know that I am praying for us all as we seek to be the Church of Jesus Christ in this day, in this time, in this iteration of Beginning.

Peace,
Bill

Creating A New Michigan Conference

Well, it’s about to begin! I’m writing from Traverse City where we are preparing for Annual Conference. Close to 2000 United Methodist’s from across Michigan will gather to take significant steps on the road to becoming the Michigan Conference.

The Design Team has worked for almost two years now and is bringing nearly two hundred pages of legislation to the Conference. The legislation creates a structure built around the mission of the new Annual Conference to empower Christ Centered Mission and Ministry – Bold Effective Leaders and – Vibrant Congregations. The legislation continues the technical and sometimes legal work of bringing together the present two Conferences into the one new Conference. The Legislation enables us to move into this next year poised to take the steps necessary to be ready for the new thing God is doing in Michigan.

I am excited about this week. I am excited about the worship we will participate in together. I’m excited about the opportunities we will have to learn new things that will help us in our ministries. I’m excited about the opportunity this Conference will provide to meet more new friends from the other side of the state. I’m excited because in the midst of questions and the constant uncertainty of the future, we are seeking to do a new thing.

May God continue to guide and empower our efforts.

Peace,
Bill

2017 Michigan Area Annual Conference
Michigan Area Design Team

A Partner in Ministry All Along The Way

I won’t be writing a Castings article the next two weeks.  My wife Robin and I are going to Mexico next Tuesday for 10 days!  On May 7 we will be celebrating 40 years of marriage; I can hardly believe it has been that long.  It just seems like yesterday that we were moving our things into married student housing at Eastern Michigan University! I know not everybody has this blessing and God uses each one of our unique situations in ministry for the work God has given, but I have had the awesome gift of a partner in ministry all along the way.

Robin and I met at a “Mid-Winter” District youth retreat on the Lansing District at age 16.  I first felt called into ministry at age 17, so we have been in this together all along the way.  And Robin has made significant sacrifices along the way in this itinerant system in which we live.  Robin is retired now, but she taught Special Education at various levels for 30 years.  Because of our 4 local church appointments she received, gave up, and earned once again her tenure − three different times!

In the early days, before computers, Robin typed sermons (sometimes on Saturday night!!).  She juggled raising kids, with a husband and father who wasn’t always able to be around in the evening or at critical moments.  She has also used her rich gifts for her own ministry serving as District Youth Coordinator on no less than three districts, singing in choirs and bands, and helping cabins full of girls at camp discover the joys and wonder of God’s grace.  We have walked the road God has given to us and it has been wonderful.

Now…it hasn’t been perfect.  There have been times we have talked with counselors to help us try and sort out issues we struggle with and continue to struggle with.  There have been times our temperaments and perspectives have brought us to different places in decision making, but for the most part, it has been a delightful journey.  And I am so humbled and thankful for the gift our journey has been and continues to be.

So….I won’t be writing Castings for the next two weeks.  I will be hanging out on a beach with my partner in life and in ministry, thinking back over the past 40 years and looking forward to all God has for us all along the way ahead.

Peace,
Bill

I Wonder What YOUR Easter Surprise Might Be?

I have never had a surprise party.  I have never been to a surprise party.  My only frame of reference for such an event is television.  Usually on TV there is some convoluted plan that goes awry and challenges the surprise that creates the “comedy” in “situation comedy.”  In the end it all works out and there is a celebration for the person who is the focus of the party.

Surprises can be fun, enjoyable, and exciting.  Like surprise parties, other surprises can be great as well.  I recently had someone pay back a debt I had basically forgotten about and written off.  I love it this time of year when the forecast says it’s going to be 45 and it turns out the be sunny and 65!  Some surprises are wonderful!

Not every surprise is a positive of course.  Sometimes life is moving along, from one day into the next and we receive a lab report that brings a surprise illness.  We have heard of such things in other people’s lives, but now it’s us and the surprise is very unsettling.  The dreaded 2:00 A.M. phone call from a friend or a child or the police is a surprise none of us want to receive.  So again, not every surprise is a positive experience.

But for those who visited the tomb of Jesus that first Easter morning, the surprise they received was life changing.  For them, it transformed Friday’s worst news ever, into a joy they could never have imagined.  It pulled back the cloud of uncertainty and fear, and opened the door to fresh hope and eternal possibilities.  The Easter surprise for those who first went to the tomb was more than they could take in, in that moment.  But as the reality sank in through the events of the days and weeks ahead, Easter’s astonishment became a brand new perspective on everything!

I wonder what might be our Easter surprise this year?  I wonder where we might find hope as we celebrate the empty tomb in our churches and our lives this year?  Most of us have places of struggle, places of doubt, places where we are challenged by life’s circumstances.  What would it mean for us to allow the promise of Easter to pervade those areas of our life and to fill them with new hope and potential?

The Easter surprise is real.  It is the core of our faith.  It lifts us to possibilities never imagined without it.  I invite you to let the message of Easter capture you anew this year.  I invite you to allow it to surround you and all the challenges you are facing just now.  I invite you to be surprised by the power and depth of the resurrection that you might live life in new ways, and celebrate with profound joy.

Peace,
Bill

 

Worship Experience

What a wonderful event we had last Saturday.  Kim Miller brought us great information and inspiration around worship practices and presentation.  She shared with us some wonderfully creative and innovative worship designs for both the elements of worship and the physical space in which worship takes place.  And while she serves in a setting with significant resources, Kim’s presentation offered us ideas on doing meaningful things on what she calls a “mud-&-spit” budget.  It was a good day as we thought about how to create more opportunities for significant “God experiences” in the lives of people already in our congregations and those visiting on any given Sunday.

All of it got me thinking about the work I’ve done as a District Superintendent over almost five years now.  As most of you know, I worship in a different church almost every week.  And as I do that I have experienced some wonderful worship.  Worship that was rich with meaning, clearly thought out and designed, worship that enabled me to easily connect with God.  I have experienced as well, what I would describe as good worship.  Places where folks offered an opportunity to engage with God, perhaps with some fits and stops here and there, but a good flow overall.  Places where it took a bit more work to stay focused, but where there was clearly effort and energy put into offering to God — and the congregation — something worthy and helpful in the Sunday morning experience.  But friends, let me be brutally honest, I have also been in some worship services that were just plain sloppy.  Clearly little effort had been put into connecting the elements together to provide a cohesive whole.  Worship was choppy and full of inside language and activity.  Music was bad and no effort was made to improve it.  The worship experience was a settling for that which was easy and routine.  And again, to be brutally honest, it was painful.

Even in some of our smallest settings, with the least amount of resources, we can pay attention to the details that make worship flow.  We can move beyond ourselves and think about the kinds of things that would help visitors connect with God.  We can give real time and prayer and energy to what we do on Sunday morning (or perhaps another day of the week), so that when we gather for worship we give our best to God, and we provide the richest opportunity possible for folks to encounter God at a deep level.

Worship is critical to the life of the church.  It is the centerpiece of what we do in the midst of a week of work and ministry.  It is an act worthy of our best.  There are great resources to help us do it better, to learn about what works and doesn’t work in connecting people to God.  I want to challenge all of us especially as we approach this year’s celebration of Easter, a huge opportunity to help people connect with God, to offer our absolute best….and then to do it again the week after!

Peace,
Bill

P.S. A few copies of Kim Miller’s books are available for purchase and pick up from the GR District Office following last Saturday’s dynamic workshops (first come, first served). Redesigning Worship and Redesigning Churches are $15 each or the pair for $25, which is well below the publisher’s pricing! Please contact Liz in the GR District Office to reserve your copies today (616.459.4503 or grdistrict@wmcumc.org).

It IS possible to stay relevant amid today’s changing culture!

I read this morning that Sears has put out a statement saying that they have “substantial doubt” that its company’s doors will stay open.  Other retail giants that have been main stays all my life, anchor stores in mall across the country, have been closing stores in many locations.  They’re not doing anything like the business they did just a few decades ago.

I wonder what folks would have said fifty years ago, if someone had suggested that these giants would close?  I suspect there would be a chuckle at the idea.  Sears was founded by Richard Warren Sears and Alvah Curtis Roebuck in 1886 for heaven’s sake!  It’s been a retail center in cities and towns across America for 130 years.  It will always be here would have been the natural assumption.

But then came Amazon.com as well as lots of other .coms.  Then came Walmart and Meijer.  I looked at my own Amazon account and realized that I made my first purchase from them in 1999 when they were primarily a book company.  I had three orders that year.  Last year I had 66 orders for everything from Altoids to computer parts, and clothes to vitamins.

There are other factors, I’m sure, that have affected Sears and other companies.  But the fact is the world of buying and selling is changing like so many other things in our culture, and some of those institutions that we once thought would always be there, are simply going by the wayside.

And the analogy to the Church is not a hard one to make, is it?  The world has changed and it is changing for us too.  There are many shifts that we could name.  Worship itself is one of them.  From the day of the week we offer worship opportunities to the location where we offer them, things are by necessity changing.

By the way there is a BIG worship training event on our District this Saturday with Kim Miller in case you hadn’t heard!!

Click → HERE ← for details!

Giving in the church has changed too.  If your congregation doesn’t offer at least automatic withdrawal from a bank account, if not instant giving on a web site; if you are relying only on people writing checks or putting cash in the plate,  then you are missing a significant portion of potential givers.

These are just a couple areas where our world is different than it was in the past, and if we don’t pay attention and move with the shifts we may well find ourselves ─ someday soon ─ putting out our own press release indicating our “substantial doubt” related to our ability to keep the doors open. And more importantly to carry out the mission of sharing Christ’s love in a broken and hurting world.

Peace,
Bill

“Field Preaching” then and now!

“About this time some disputes took place in the Fetter-lane society as to lay preaching; and Mr. Charles Wesley, in the absence of his brother, declared warmly against it. While his brother was still at Bristol, he had also a painful interview with the Archbishop of Canterbury, who objected to the irregularity of his course, and hinted at proceeding to excommunication. This conversation was to him the occasion of great perplexity of mind, which being observed by Mr. Whitefield, he urged him to preach in the fields the following Sunday, and thus commit himself almost beyond the possibility of retreat. He followed this advice, and preached, on June 24th, to nearly a thousand persons in Moorfields. At Oxford, the Dean dealt severely with him in regard of field-preaching; but on his return to London, he resumed the practice in Moorfields, and on Kennington common; and many were aroused to a serious inquiry after religion. On one occasion it was calculated that ten thousand persons were assembled to hear him.”

I read this passage out of John Wesley’s journal’s this past week.  I had to smile because I sometimes believe that there are new things!  But this text reassured me that at least in terms of human relations in the context of the Church, there is very little new under heaven!

In case you are not aware of the issues Wesley is addressing, there was a brand new practice that Wesley and his friends were engaging in called “Field Preaching.”  Field Preaching was basically preaching outdoors.  Gathering a group of people in a place where people were and sharing with them the Good News of Jesus Christ.  As Wesley’s journal indicates identifying a gathering of a thousand people at Kennington common, who were “aroused to serious inquiry after religion,” Field Preaching was working.  It was reaching people in significant ways.  It was making a difference.

But there was significant pushback against it.  It was viewed by the religious elite as “vulgar.” It was not a “proper” expression.  Worship was to take place in a sanctuary with specific liturgy and written sermons.  Those in power even threatened to excommunicate Charles for his actions.

Wesley was perplexd at their resistance.  To him the church was being the church.  People were being reached with the gospel, lives were being changed.  How could anyone be against that?!

And most of us who look at it from our vantage point today side with Wesley and scoff at the religious elites too.

But friends as I go from church to church and we talk together about mission and vision for today’s world, as we look at how we might be the church that sparks revival in our day, I too, often hear similar responses to what Wesley received. It’s shared in lots of ways from worship style preferences to the use of the pastor’s time.  It shows up in the focus of energy and money inside as opposed to outside the current congregation.  The struggle is alive and well today.

So, there is nothing new under the sun!  But the same principles and values of outreach that created the Wesleyan revival in the 1700’s can create new revivals today.  May we always be those who look beyond protecting to investing, from us to them, from religion to Spirit!

Peace,
Bill