Prayer and Action to End Gun Violence

This week rather than writing my own words I want to share with you a resolution adopted at our 2016 General Conference and thus included in our Book of Resolutions.  Somehow it seemed appropriate.

“As followers of Jesus, called to live into the reality of God’s dream of shalom as described by Micah, we must address the epidemic of gun violence so “that he may teach us his ways and that we may walk in God’s paths.” Therefore, we call upon United Methodists to prayerfully address gun violence in their local context. Some of the ways in which to prevent gun violence include the following:

  1. For congregations to make preventing gun violence a regular part of our conversations and prayer times. Gun violence must be worshipfully and theologically reflected on, and we encourage United Methodist churches to frame conversations theologically by utilizing resources such as “Kingdom Dreams, Violent Realities: Reflections on Gun Violence from Micah 4:1-4” produced by the General Board of Church and Society.
  2. For congregations to assist those affected by gun violence through prayer, pastoral care, creating space, and encouraging survivors to share their stories, financial assistance, and through identifying other resources in their communities as victims of gun violence and their families walk through the process of grieving and healing.
  3. For individual United Methodists who own guns as hunters or collectors to safely and securely store their guns and to teach the importance of practicing gun safety.
  4. For United Methodist congregations that have not experienced gun violence to form ecumenical and interfaith partnerships with faith communities that have experienced gun violence in order to support them and learn from their experiences.
  5. For United Methodist congregations to lead or join in ecumenical or interfaith gatherings for public prayer at sites where gun violence has occurred and partner with law enforcement to help prevent gun violence.
  6. For United Methodist congregations to partner with local law-enforcement agencies and community groups to identify gun retailers that engage in retail practices designed to circumvent laws on gun sales and ownership, encourage full legal compliance, and to work with groups like Heeding God’s Call that organize faith-based campaigns to encourage gun retailers to gain full legal compliance with appropriate standards and laws.
  7. For United Methodist congregations to display signs that prohibit carrying guns onto church property.
  8. For United Methodist congregations to advocate at the local and national level for laws that prevent or reduce gun violence. Some of those measures include:
  • Universal background checks on all gun purchases
  • Ratification of the Arms Trade Treaty
  • Ensuring all guns are sold through licensed gun retailers
  • Prohibiting all individuals convicted of violent crimes from purchasing a gun for a fixed time period
  • Prohibiting all individuals under restraining order due to threat of violence from purchasing a gun
  • Prohibiting persons with serious mental illness, who pose a danger to themselves and their communities, from purchasing a gun
  • Ensuring greater access to services for those suffering from mental illness
  • Establishing a minimum age of 21 years for a gun purchase or possession
  • Banning large-capacity ammunition magazines and weapons designed to fire multiple rounds each time the trigger is pulled
  • Promoting new technologies to aid law-enforcement agencies to trace crime guns and promote public safety.”

ADOPTED 2016

See Social Principles, ¶ 162.

From The Book of Resolutions of The United Methodist Church – 2016. Copyright © 2016 by The United Methodist Publishing House. Used by permission.

Partnership and Covenant with Liberia

We’ve been celebrating our connection with Liberia lately.  As you are perhaps aware, the Detroit Conference has had a long standing partnership and covenant with Liberia.  And as we begin this new thing as the Michigan Annual Conference soon, we are seeking to invite churches and individuals from our side of the state to engage with this important ministry as well.

We, on the Grand Rapids District, have had a head start on this endeavor as we have connected with the Lofa River District of Liberia and just a week and a half ago completed our effort to get Superintendent Cecilia Mapleh a truck to enable more effective ministry on her district (click HERE to read the story and see recent photos!)

Last night Bishop Quire, the newly elected Bishop of the Liberian Annual Conference, was here on our District sharing about both his vision for and the needs of his country and the church.  He also shared great appreciation for the truck!

After Bishop Quire shared for a bit we asked questions and one of the questions was what are the primary needs of the people in Liberia?  The Bishop’s response was telling, “Well” he said, “I hesitate to give you the whole grocery list!”  Friends, there is indeed a grocery list!  I listened to stories about parts of Liberia where the church has begun orphanages for children whose parents died during the Ebola crisis.  As the Bishop shared about the lack of schools, medical care, clean water and other needs in many rural areas of the country and the fact that due to the years of civil war there is at least a generation that has very little if any education.  As he spoke about his vision of building up the agriculture abilities especially with the amount of land that the church owns.  As he lifted up the challenges and the commitment of the Pastors and Superintendents who walk miles to serve their churches and people and who experience and embrace extraordinary sacrifices to do it.

As I listened to all that he shared, I thought about some of the things that had taken my attention and energy during the earlier parts of the day. I thought about some of the things that had annoyed me or caused me some level of stress.  And while those things are real and a part of my life and yours as I laid them alongside some of the things Bishop Quire shared with us, the distance between them was significant.

Now I’ve not always been good about knowing what to do with that.  I tend to feel guilty and sometimes that’s all that happens because the problems seem so big (because they are), and I don’t know where to start.  And so I turn on the TV and go on with my life.  I can’t fix it all so I struggle to feel like anything I do makes any real difference.

We learned last night that to put a child through high school for a year costs $300.  So we took up an offering and raised $300.00 among the eight of us that were there.  One child will go to school because we met together last night.

Liberia still has lots of problems.  And that’s just Liberia.  I could write lots of other articles about the plight of Puerta Rico devastated by hurricanes, other countries and people who are living with war and daily life and death uncertainties.

But a Superintendent on the Lofa River District has a truck because of the gifts of our District, and one child will go to school next year who wouldn’t have been able to go had we not met last night.  I guess it’s a start.

Peace,
Bill

Cecilia’s long wait is finally over!

Many of you will remember that two years ago during each of our Church Conferences we received an offering the proceeds of which were to go for the purchase of a four wheel drive vehicle for Rev. Cecilia Mapleh, District Superintendent of the Lofa District in Liberia.  Folks gave at the church conferences and folks continued to give after the church conferences were completed.

Ultimately we reached the goal of $17,000 to purchase the used truck that would take DS Cecilia to her appointed rounds, enabling her to be more effective in caring for the people and churches of her very rural and often isolated district.  We reached that goal in the early part of 2016, and in my mind I expected that DS Mapleh would be on the road by February.  But…it didn’t work out that way!

We have been working with the General Board of Global Ministries, the Liberia Annual Conference and many others to accomplish this task ever since the money was raised.  We have been in phone and email contact with Cecilia and many others at least every other week.  It was nobody’s fault.  Everyone was seeking to make it happen, but finding a safe and effective means of carrying out this mission was a challenge, to say the least.

But thanks be to God, while there may be trouble in the night, Joy comes in the Morning! After some 18 months of finding our way forward, this past week, we received word that the money had arrived and the truck had been purchased.  We also received some wonderful pictures of Cecilia heading down one of the dirt roads of her district, no longer on foot or on a bicycle that doesn’t work at all in the rainy season, but driving a gift from co-workers in Christ from the Grand Rapids District.

As I looked at those pictures (below) my heart was warmed and I was reminded again that while we can’t solve all of the problems of the third world, while we can’t fix all the issues of Liberia, we can make a difference for one servant of Christ and the District she serves.  You have done that.  It took a while!  But you have made that difference.  Thank you!

Peace,
Bill

Love, Respect and Trust

The Cabinet is in retreat this week.  We call it a retreat basically because we are away at a location instead of at the ministry center and we wear casual clothes.  Beyond that it’s long work days!  We have a fall “retreat” in September every year because we don’t usually meet in the summer and there is always lots to do and lots to catch up on.  It also gives us a chance to hear what’s happening in one another’s lives.

It’s that last part that I want to share about this week.  This is my sixth year on the Cabinet which also means it’s my sixth year out of the local church. Being a pastor is who I am.  It is who I am to the core of my being and while I really do love the ministry of District Superintendent, I miss sharing life with a congregation.  I miss being a part of people’s lives on a week to week basis.  I miss the kind of connection that happens in a Bible Study where questions are raised and new insight is gained and decisions made.  I miss it all (well most of it anyway).  And honestly from some of the stories I’ve heard about how Cabinets sometimes function, I know I would never make it in some of those settings.

But I am incredibly grateful for the people I get to work with on this Cabinet.  I am incredibly grateful for the leadership of this amazing Bishop and our Clergy Assistant to the Bishop, John Boley.  We are, the 15 of us, a deep community.  We are a praying community.  We are a loving community.  And I am so honored to be a part of these wonderful servants of Christ and Christ’s church.

And as I sit here thinking about how blessed I am in this community, I can’t help but think about you and the churches of the Grand Rapids District.  Friends my abiding prayer for you is that you are experiencing this same sense of joy and celebration in your Church community.  I pray that as you work together in your community you are discovering − even in the work − a depth of relationship that is rich and life giving.  I pray that as you leave a meeting about vision, or money, or what’s next for your congregation, you leave tired and weary having spent yourself in the task but joyful because you are in it together.  I pray you leave feeling connected and engaged and while there is significant work ahead, and the road may not be smooth, you have your eyes on Christ and you find excitement in the fact that you are rowing the boat together.

I pray that your community of faith, be it big or small, rich or struggling financially, theologically to one end of the spectrum or the other, is a place where you know you are loved deeply by God and by those with whom you share the journey.  I pray you know without a shadow of a doubt that while you may not always (or often) think alike, you have one another’s backs because you love, respect, and trust one another.

I am grateful, deeply grateful that I find that love, respect and trust on the Cabinet.  I pray you are finding that too, and are building that in your Church.

Peace,
Bill

Taking Time Away

I am taking a few days this week up north doing some planning.  I have done this annually for the past several decades.  When I was serving in the local church I spent these days doing sermon planning for the year ahead.  Now I get ready for Church Conference season and try to take a balcony view of the District and Conference related to my role as Missional Strategist.

This planning time is a week I look forward to every year.  I anticipate the opportunity to take these days, step back and look to what’s next.  I like it partly because I get to spend a week by a lake and enjoy the beauty of the area around Traverse City.  But more than that, it really helps me move beyond the moment and the urgency of the immediate, to both practically plan and dream.

I wanted to write about this time I take away every year because as I talk with pastors I know that some never take time to step back and get a balcony view.  They never take time to get away from the regular daily activities to think deeply, to pray, to listen and to breathe. And my encouragement to pastors, and really to all of us, is to take the time.

For pastors, I believe doing some kind of sermon planning retreat is essential.  Folks do it in different ways.  Some take a week once a year, others take a few days every few months, some work with worship teams and others are on their own.  And I’m not suggesting that my way is the best way, but my belief is that we need to do it some way.

Beyond the sermon creators among us, I think all of us need time away.  I would invite all of us to consider taking time at least once a year to retreat, to create space to hear from God, to connect with God.  If you haven’t had a practice of taking this time in your life, start with a day, start with an afternoon.  My suspicion is this time away will become more and more important to you, and something you eagerly anticipate!

Friends there is so much more I could say about this and I’d say more but I’m ready to get back to my time away!

Peace,
Bill

A Partner in Ministry All Along The Way

I won’t be writing a Castings article the next two weeks.  My wife Robin and I are going to Mexico next Tuesday for 10 days!  On May 7 we will be celebrating 40 years of marriage; I can hardly believe it has been that long.  It just seems like yesterday that we were moving our things into married student housing at Eastern Michigan University! I know not everybody has this blessing and God uses each one of our unique situations in ministry for the work God has given, but I have had the awesome gift of a partner in ministry all along the way.

Robin and I met at a “Mid-Winter” District youth retreat on the Lansing District at age 16.  I first felt called into ministry at age 17, so we have been in this together all along the way.  And Robin has made significant sacrifices along the way in this itinerant system in which we live.  Robin is retired now, but she taught Special Education at various levels for 30 years.  Because of our 4 local church appointments she received, gave up, and earned once again her tenure − three different times!

In the early days, before computers, Robin typed sermons (sometimes on Saturday night!!).  She juggled raising kids, with a husband and father who wasn’t always able to be around in the evening or at critical moments.  She has also used her rich gifts for her own ministry serving as District Youth Coordinator on no less than three districts, singing in choirs and bands, and helping cabins full of girls at camp discover the joys and wonder of God’s grace.  We have walked the road God has given to us and it has been wonderful.

Now…it hasn’t been perfect.  There have been times we have talked with counselors to help us try and sort out issues we struggle with and continue to struggle with.  There have been times our temperaments and perspectives have brought us to different places in decision making, but for the most part, it has been a delightful journey.  And I am so humbled and thankful for the gift our journey has been and continues to be.

So….I won’t be writing Castings for the next two weeks.  I will be hanging out on a beach with my partner in life and in ministry, thinking back over the past 40 years and looking forward to all God has for us all along the way ahead.

Peace,
Bill

Lent is a time for sorting

I have been cleaning out files on my computer.  It is amazing to me how fast files and folders — designed to make life more efficient — can become unruly!  I’m certain I had a plan when I set up a given file structure.  I had a purpose and an understanding of how that structure would work and benefit me moving forward.  But somewhere along the line I forgot what I had done, and I started a new folder with a different file system in another place that made sense in that moment!  Consequently, as I’m working my way through the cleanup process this morning, I’m discovering that there are four locations of folders that should be in one place, and sometimes multiple copies of the files in each of those areas!

I think I’m getting a handle on it and I’ll probably have a much cleaner structure soon ─ at least for a while!

As I’m doing this work, I’m also thinking about the worship service tonight that begins the season of Lent.  Through the years I have engaged a number of different practices during the Lenten season.  Sometime I have removed things from my life to allow a deeper focus on God.  Other times I’ve added things with the goal of enabling a richer connection during these weeks.  Lent is a time for sorting. It is a time for evaluating where we are, and what in our lives has gotten perhaps a bit unruly and needs cleaning up.  It may be that as we take stock, we will discover that we need to become more involved.  Maybe we will find that our level of commitment to our faith and path of discipleship needs to be enhanced by activity.  Maybe we’ll discover that our life is filled with too many activities, even at church, and what we need to do is create some space for God to speak.

Whatever it is that you sense God calling you to this Lenten season, I pray that you will choose to follow and discover the richness and renewal God longs to give.  May God bless all of us as we give ourselves to this year’s Lenten journey.

Peace,
Bill

A Desire to Change

I had the opportunity to attend the Reach Summit last weekend in Troy.  I have appreciated this event since its inception a few years ago, but was unable to attend last year so I was pleased to attend this year.

One of the seminars I went to was a workshop on MissionInsite.  I’ve used this tool in the Local Church and on the District for all the years we have had it available to our Annual Conference.  It is a treasure trove of information.

The seminar addressed the MOSAIC types material MissionInsite provides.  MOSAIC types, in simplest terms, help you identify groups of people by life stage, interests, and several other factors.  It helps understand the folks living in neighborhoods around a given church, and can guide a church as they think about how their programs might resonate with their unique communities’ needs.  It is a very helpful tool.

Of course, for MOSAIC types or any of MissionInsite’s material to be helpful to a church, there needs to be something present.  What needs to be present is a desire within the congregation to grow.  Now that may sound very strange to you, “Doesn’t every church want to grow?” you may ask.  Indeed!  I have not yet met a church that didn’t SAY it wanted to grow.  I have not met with an SPRC team or a Leadership Council that didn’t, in some way, tell me their desire to reach more young people and young families.  And I listen to their desires, and at some level, I believe that it’s genuine.

But then we talk about the kinds of things it will take to grow.  We talk about things like the MOSAIC groups in their area and what could be done to reach out to them.  And hear things like how horrible it was when the outreach team suggested moving the worship time of the Traditional service back a half hour in order to offer a different style that might reach some new people. And in doing so, how that disrupted and upset so many of the long-time members.

You see, the truth is, growth is hard.  It’s harder than it’s ever been.  And it won’t happen if we just wish for it.  It won’t even happen if we just pray for it ─ though I would certainly suggest prayer! God often helps us see a plan, a way to move towards the changes that will ultimately help us to experience growth.  But, growth is hard.  Growth takes a laser focus and it takes a constant willingness to do EVERYTHING we can, trying lots of things ─ things that are not about those who are here now, but about those who aren’t here yet ─ if it is to be accomplished.

And the truth is, the hard truth is, the really, hard truth is that in many of our churches, sadly we just don’t have the desire to work that hard.

Peace,
Bill

Keeping a Balance Through It All

It was a wonderful summer!  I sat by the lake in my hammock.  I completed work around our property that I have wanted to do for 10 years, but never had time to engage when we were only there for a few days.  I traveled to North Carolina for a wonderful conference and I got food poisoning on the way to the United Methodist night at the Tigers, (that last one wasn’t one I want to repeat)! It was indeed a renewing summer.  Thanks to all those who prayed for me and encouraged me during these months.

But it wasn’t all renewal.  A few times meetings, I had to attend and congregational issues in the Conference, brought me out of renewal into reality!  And the reality I speak of, we all know well.  It is the reality that life goes on.  We may have a plan, (and I hope you do), to be disconnected to rest and recuperate, but sometimes the needs of our work press in and we need to respond.  I’m guessing that at least a couple of pastors reading this article had vacations interrupted by funerals this summer.  This is a typical scenario, a leader in your congregation died and you knew you had to go back and care for that family.  By the way if you did that, you still have those days off and you need to pin them to your next vacation (have your SPRC call me if there’s any question about that).  But, the fact is, stuff happens and it doesn’t always happen on our schedule.

There is a balance here to be sure.  Some of us as clergy have an over developed sense of self-importance.  So we either never take vacations or we come back for things that others in the church could really handle.  That savior complex some of us have is not helpful and will most likely lead to LESS effectiveness as well as difficulty getting through the door because our head won’t fit!  Oh yes, I know, some churches love those pastors who do everything and never care for themselves, but it isn’t healthy and it ultimately isn’t good for the church either.  So while there are times when we appropriately work on a day off or a part of a vacation so that we can care for the needs of the people God has called us to serve, there is a balance that we must keep.

It is good to be in the office today.  I’m OK with the fact that the earliest hour appointment Liz could give to the person that called today is in October. I appreciate the work I have to do.  It’s a gift.  I have appreciated the pastors I met with today and the work they are doing on behalf of the kingdom of God.  Work is a gift.  Rest is a gift.  There is a balance in it all.

It’s been a wonderful summer!  It’s going to be a wonderful fall!  Thanks be to God.

Peace,
Bill

A forum to share life changing, hope-filled, joyous stories happening in YOUR CHURCH!

Friends, as I shared with you last week here in DS Castings, I am going to be away this summer.  Following Annual Conference, I will be on renewal leave through Labor Day.  This means, among other things, that I will not be writing this column each week!  I know that many of you are asking, “How will I make it through these long summer months without this weekly word from my DS!!”  Well here’s what I was thinking…

What if castings became, for the summer, a place to tell stories?  What if it became a place where the good news of life transformation in our churches was shared?  So often there are things happening in our ministries that don’t get told.  There are lives being changed, people discovering hope, receiving fresh meaning and joy in all kinds of ways because of what we do and how we embody God’s love, but the story never gets told.  The Good News is received but the “light” gets hidden under a bushel.

So this summer what I want to invite you to do is share those stories!  Write them up and email them in to Liz and we’ll share and celebrate the work of God in our midst.

Too often we focus on the negative side of our church.  We highlight the differences we have.  We center on the scarcity we struggle with and the problems we are encountering.  Let’s take time this summer to talk to one another about the ways we, the United Methodist Churches of the Grand Rapids District are seeing God touching and changing lives!

All you need to do is write the story and send it to Liz Bode our District Administrative Assistant at grdistict@wmcumc.org.

I’m looking forward – with you – to reading these great tales of faith as I relax by the lake!

Have a wonderful summer and don’t forget to share what God is doing in your midst.

Peace,
Bill